RIGGING SURVEYS

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Why is necessary to conduct rigging surveys?

Rigging surveyor job is to check and review the key components of the boat system to ensure that is fit for purpose.

In general, a Rigging system survey has three objectives:

  1. Check that the system has been regularly inspected and serviced.
  2. Check the states of the sails
  3. Check that the rigging is less than 10 years old.

Regular service periods:

The regular service period is calculated by Insurance companies, flag states, Cost guard, and standards organizations, based on FATIGUE LOAD CYCLE of the rigging. The statistical data shows that rigging failure rates are higher after 10 years.

The picture below shows how a load cycle in the normal operating range, due to the large numbers of such cycles can cause cumulative damage to the material.

The 5 years inspection needs to be done with the mast un-stepped, as it is impossible to check key components (Terminal, plates, buckles, wires, stays, etc.) with the rigging fully un-assembled. Also, NDT (nondestructive Test) as a penetrant liquid test need to complete with the system on the floor.

The 10-year rigging checks need to be completed with all rigging wires replaced, due to the FATIGUE LOAD CYCLES, which normally cause Cracks, deformations that affect the structural properties of the rigging system.

See the video below where you can see many comon failures we have colledted during years of rigging surveys.

The list below shows the most common issues found after rigging collapses:

  1. Terminal and fittings failures
  2. Turn Buckle failures
  3. Mast deformations
  4. Chain Plates failures
  5. Stays (wire) failures
  6. Rod heads

Below few notes from the Rigging experts:

  • Keep your rigging clear of corrosion, ALWAYS
  • Regularly check tension on stays
  • Never remove safety pins from Turnbuckles
  • Recommended to use Split pins.
  • Never replace only one side Stays or Shroud, the other side (older) will be a weak link.
  • If replacing a stay, is recommended to replace the associated turnbuckles.
  • Bring mast down every 5 years for inspection, if needed perform NDT (Nondestructive test)
  • Bring mast down every 10 years for inspection and ALL rigging components replacement.

The US Coast Guard published a Marine Safety Alert 07-09, call SAILBOAT RIGGING DANGER, you can download on the link below, has many useful information and tips for any sailor.

If you have any comments, please write to us.

WHY TO USE MARINE SURVEYORS?

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Very often we get asked about boat surveys and what are the benefits of doing so, this week we are going to discuss details on the importance of marine surveys.

What is a Marine Survey?

it is a comprehensive check-up for boats, designed to identify existing problems, point out areas to improve, and give a detailed picture of the overall health of the vessel.

The two major reasons to hire a Marine Surveyor are:

1 Get an Unbiassed Assessment

When you are buying a boat, especially second-hand, the current owner may not be aware of any existing problems, if there is any, This is when a marine survey is very important before settlement.

During a repurchase survey the marine surveyor has the opportunity to assess all aspects of the vessel:

  • Structural
  • Mechanical Components
  • Rigging
  • Plumbing
  • Electrical Systems
  • Hull Planking
  • Propulsion System

As a result, the surveyor submits a report, with recommendations and a conclusion, that can help the price negotiation and repairs needed.

2 Get Profesional Valuation

Many marine underwriters (insurers), require a complete survey to be completed prior they will ensure a pre-owned vessel.

A professional marine surveyor will inform whether any repair needed to be completed and the cost of each repair accurately, this information is vital and can be used to determine if the boat is a good value and what is estimated provision in years ahead for upkeep.

Buying a boat is a big step, and a huge investment, a Surveyor will be your best advisor during this process.

Smart Pipe Surveys using Robots

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Now days most survey tasks involve robots that are designed in such way that they remove human intervention from labour intensive and hazardous work environment.

Sometimes they are also used to inspect inaccessible spaces / confines places which are generally impossible to access by humans.

Many pipes comes in the dangerous spaces because they carry toxic chemicals, fluids and most of the time has small internal diameter or bends which become inaccessible to human.

The complex internal geometry and hazard content constraints of pipes demand robots for inspection of such pipes in order to check corrosion level of pipe, recovery of usable parts from pipe interior, sampling of sludge and scale formation on pipe internal surface etc

In 24 Marine we have developed a Pipe Robot that ensure you are getting a pipe survey cost effective and reducing human exposure. we have developed virtual reality pipe inspection, that bring your pipes to real life.

Smart marine surveyors located at Panama, bringing smart technologies to industries.

EL PRINCIPAL OBJETIVO DE TODA INVESTIGACIÓN CONSISTE EN IDENTIFICAR LAS CAUSAS

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El principal objetivo de toda investigación consiste en identificar las causas de los siniestros, con la finalidad de poder emitir recomendaciones tendentes a evitar que vuelvan a suceder. Nunca se ha de tratar de buscar culpabilidades.

Asimismo, resulta de máxima importancia la cooperación y colaboración de todas las partes involucradas, Armadores, Dueños de buques, Estados Ribereños, Estados de Abanderamiento, Gente de mar, etc. con la finalidad de garantizar la trasparencia y veracidad de la información obtenida y, con ella, poder esclarecer las verdaderas causas del incidente.

http://actualidadmp.com/articulos/luis-chavez-la-cruz-ingeniero-naval-marine-consultant-surveyor-panama-panama-el-principal-objetivo-de-toda-investigacion-consiste-en-identificar-las-causas-de-los-siniestros-con-la-f/

Case Study: Deadly Fall Into Water While Rigging Accommodation Ladder

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From https://www.marineinsight.com/case-studies/case-study-deadly-fall-into-water-while-rigging-accommodation-ladder/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+MarineInsight+%28Marine+Insight%29

An inbound container vessel had just picked up the pilot. Two crew were on the upper deck preparing the port accommodation ladder prior to mustering at their mooring stations. Although they had brought two life vests on deck with them, these floatation devices stayed on the deck as they went about their work.

The hoist winch was tested by lowering the accommodation ladder approximately 1 metre and then slightly raising it. It was then lowered approximately 3 metres to allow a crew member to walk under the davit frame. A crew member stepped on to the upper platform and proceeded to the lower end where he rigged a section of collapsible handrails. He then went to the lower platform to make the rails secure while another crew member secured the safety ropes around the upper platform.

Suddenly, a loud bang was heard followed by a whirring sound as the ladder fell rapidly towards the sea. The lower ladder broke away and fell into the water, taking the attending crew member with it. The upper
section of the ladder was left hanging vertically down from its upper platform hinges with the hoist wire dangling from the davit.

A crew member alerted the bridge via VHF radio and then ran aft to look for the victim over the stern. A tug was close by, but there was no sign of the victim. The vessel was in the relatively confined waters of the port and making between 5 and 6 knots through the water. One of the attending tugs and the pilot boat were assigned to look for the victim, as the vessel was constrained by the restricted water. The victim was spotted about half a metre below the surface of the water and recovered by the pilot boat crew some 10 to 15 minutes after the event, but there were no signs of life.

The subsequent autopsy determined the cause of death to be ‘drowning with blunt force injuries’. The victim had suffered blunt force injuries to his head, neck, chest, back, abdomen and legs, resulting in a broken right femur, fractured ribs, multiple bruising and abrasions. These injuries were not considered to be fatal.

Lessons learned

  • Accommodation ladder failures, although rare, are certainly not unheard of and numerous lives have been lost as a result. Risks involved in rigging and securing accommodation ladders should be duly accounted for.
  • As in several of the MARS reports in this issue, the attending crew did not take basic precautions such as using fall protection and donning a PFD. The lack of these precautions cannot be solely attributed to the crew. The company and vessel leadership must also bear responsibility.
  • The failure in this case to release the lifebuoys and smoke floats once the victim was in the water was particularly significant. It denied the ships involved in the search a visible reference, and also potentially denied the victim the buoyancy he required to remain afloat.